Newsroom

a group of indigenous women performing a ritual dance

Humanities Research Center supports Pocahontas Reframed Film Festival and launches Karenne Wood writer/artist residency

Nov. 30, 2021

With a rich menu of more than 20 films, The Pocahontas Film Festival showcased the work of nationally-acclaimed Indigenous filmmakers from the United States and Canada, as well work by emerging local artists.

After interning at the Greater Richmond Partnership last spring and summer, Fatima Osborne landed a full-time job opportunity with the organization this fall. (Kevin Morley, University Marketing)

Class of 2021: Fatima Osborne is using a love of storytelling to bring business to Richmond

Nov. 30, 2021

The mass communications student and intern-turned-administrative coordinator at the Greater Richmond Partnership enjoys working in social media and ‘letting people be heard.’

A new Native writer/artist residency program at VCU will honor the late Karenne Wood.

Humanities Research Center launches Native writer/artist residency program

Nov. 29, 2021

The program honors the legacy of Karenne Wood, a member of the Monacan Indian tribe and a poet, activist, tribal historian and educator who lectured at VCU on many occasions.

VCU Afghan Student Organization officers: Rida Jamal (left), Sadef Osmanzai (back), Waris Bahrami (right) and Yasameen Anwari (front). (Tom Kojcsich, University Marketing)

Mobilizing to help Afghans in need

Nov. 22, 2021

Responding to the humanitarian crisis in Afghanistan, VCU students and graduates of Afghan descent are raising money, donating supplies, assisting refugees and providing information in a chaotic time.

Turner's undergraduate experiences include time as a research intern at the National Institutes of Health. (Allen Jones, University Marketing)

Class of 2021: Triniti Turner is driven by a passion for research and forensic science

Nov. 19, 2021

The graduating student’s experiences include time in a forensic molecular biology lab and as a research intern at the National Institutes of Health.

An injury cut short Shae Gavit's military career. Now she hopes to help veterans, active-duty military and military families struggling with substance and alcohol abuse. (Kevin Morley, University Marketing)

Class of 2021: Former Marine wants to help veterans who suffer from addiction

Nov. 18, 2021

Though an injury cut short her military career, Shae Gavit wants to carry out the oath she took to serve others.

Derick Waller, left, with then-WABC photographer Gus Alonso, center, and WABC photographer John Sprei. (Courtesy of Derick Waller)

Emmy-winning reporter and alum Derick Waller on Trump, journalism, VCU and life in New York

Nov. 17, 2021

Waller’s journey to WABC-TV — the most watched station in the nation’s largest media market — has been one of big stories and big dreams.

VCU students can get a taste of other cultures and learn from peers from around the world by participating in programs like Global Cafe. These programs make global education accessible to students with international interests but who aren't able to study abroad. (Kevin Morley, University Marketing)

Beyond borders: How VCU is expanding opportunities so all students have access to a global education

Nov. 17, 2021

From Global Café to Cultural Conversations, nearly a dozen new programs at the university aim to provide students with international experiences.

Tosha Yingling. “Disability studies is as important for people that consider themselves able-bodied as people with disabilities, particularly when we talk about race or class.” (Kevin Morley, University Marketing)

Disability studies certificate helps students critique social models through lectures, readings, guest speakers and research

Nov. 11, 2021

The Partnership for People with Disabilities in collaboration with the School of Education launched the certificate as a unique interdisciplinary sequence of courses.

A VCU-led study of students in seven countries early in the pandemic finds that college students were more likely to practice social distancing if they believed two things: that it would protect against COVID-19 and that it was an action they could easily carry out. (Getty Images)

To persuade college students to practice social distancing, scaring them into action isn’t enough

Nov. 9, 2021

A VCU-led study of students in 7 countries early in the pandemic finds that effective messages emphasized that social distancing would protect against COVID-19 and that it was something people could easily do.