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Research

The College of Humanities and Sciences develops and advances nationally recognized student and faculty scholarship, research and creative initiatives committed to addressing challenges in our urban Richmond community and beyond.

We aim to become a leader in integrating meaningful engagement with real-world challenges that support the development of global citizens.

Student Research

We have many faculty who are internationally recognized experts in their fields. In the College of Humanities and Sciences, we prioritize student engagement and interaction with faculty. We don't just want you to help with research, we want you to lead.

The diversity of our research means students can obtain hands-on experience in many different areas in order to find their passion. Many CHS faculty conduct community engaged research, which allows students the opportunity to conduct research that has a meaningful, positive impact on VCU and our Richmond community.

Faculty Research

Our faculty conduct research on an extraordinarily diverse set of topics, ranging from the understanding of the histories of Native American people, to addressing inequality and disparities in education, to climate change and the development of alternative and efficient energy sources.

CHS faculty regularly win a variety of prestigious awards, fellowships and scholarships, including Woodrow Wilson fellowships and Fulbright scholarships. They also hold some of the largest grants at VCU, including center grants from the Centers for Disease Control to prevent youth violence and from the Federal Drug Administration and National Institutes of Health to understand the health consequences of e-cigarettes and the impact of policies put in place to regulate them.

Student and Faculty Research in the News

Researchers have created a computational and experimental demonstration of a theory that's been explored by VCU Department of Physics researchers since the 1990s. This illustration shows the new superatom cluster that VCU, Columbia and Harvard researchers developed, produced in a lab and tested. (Courtesy of Arthur Reber)

May 18, 2022

From theory to practice: New stable, magnetic superatom could power innovations in nanomaterials

Developed by VCU, Columbia and Harvard researchers, the structure of this superatom could serve as a building block for the creation of new materials for semiconductors, microchips, cellphones and more.

Jamie Zaleta, a VCU Forensic Science graduate student, holds a bullet casing in the VCU Police Department's firing range in November 2021. (Photo: Corey Byers, University Public Affairs)

May 12, 2022

Forensic science graduate student collaborates with VCU Police sergeant on bullet casing research

Jamie Zaleta needed cartridge casings for her thesis project examining fingerprint development, which is the use of chemicals to find unseen (latent) fingerprints on different surfaces.