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Graduate studies

The College of Humanities and Sciences offers a breadth of graduate degrees and certificates that originate from the sciences, social sciences and humanities disciplines. Graduate programs in the College play a critical role in supporting VCU’s mission to advance our status as an urban public research university. Our programs directly or indirectly address society’s 21st century challenges with a focus on the development of knowledge through scientific investigations, scholarly contributions and creative works.

Browse graduate programs

Graduate students have access to all the resources necessary for academic success, including technology and equipment, office and research space, and graduate assistantship support (contact specific program for information regarding stipend and tuition support).

Most importantly, our programs are committed to:

  1. providing a supportive positive mentoring relationship between faculty and students
  2. developing programs for graduate students that bridge graduate degrees to professional opportunities
  3. enhancing an appreciation for the critical importance of the cross fertilization of ideas and interdisciplinary approaches

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Our grad students in the news:

glass of liquor next to a book
What predicts college students’ drinking habits? How much they think others are drinking.
A new study by VCU researchers examines students’ genetic risk of alcohol use, roommates’ drinking habits and the perception of peer drinking.
American Civil War Museum
History grad students’ Civil War research will be on display at American Civil War Museum’s grand opening
When the new American Civil War Museum at Historic Tredegar officially opens its doors on Saturday, May 4, visitors will have an opportunity to check out new scholarly research conducted by Virginia Commonwealth University history graduate students about the Civil War and how it is remembered.
History graduate student Josh Dow (left) and Eric Johnson, head of innovative media at VCU Libraries, prepare to use a technique called photogrammetry to capture a 3D image of a wooden game at Agecroft Hall & Gardens. (Photo by Brian McNeill, University Public Affairs)
Joshua Dow is creating 3D images to make Agecroft Hall’s collection more accessible
Sitting on a rotating turntable is a small wooden game called Nine Men's Morris, part of the collection of Agecroft Hall & Gardens, a historic house museum within a Tudor manor that was brought to Richmond in the 1920s piece by piece from Manchester, England.